Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

Aging in place actions in Maine making a difference

Aging in place actions
Elaine Briggs (Photo by Elise Klysa/Kennebec Journal)

Wayne looking for ways to help elderly age in place

A citizens’ group is trying to coordinate seniors’ needs with services that other residents can offer.

By Charles Eichacker, Portland Press Herald, Central Maine

March 14, 2017

“In the 17 years Elaine Briggs has lived at the northern end of Wilson Pond, she’s made the little property her own.

She maintains a flower garden. She makes soap in the basement of her boxy, one-story home with ingredients such as lavender and spearmint. She isn’t a vinyl snob, but maintains a record player and a collection of old country albums. Chickadees compete with squirrels at the feeder on her front lawn, and she sometimes can coax the small birds to peck seeds from the palm of her hand. She can put her kayak in the stream behind her house and paddle to the pond. She likes her neighbors, who have helped move snow from the front of her driveway after heavy storms.

Now 63, she hopes to stay there as long as possible, and also help fellow Wayne residents stay in their homes as they get older.

A group of citizens has been seeking the views of people like Briggs. They want to make Wayne a community where residents can age in place more easily, and they’ve been surveying town residents to get a better idea of the needs of the elderly, as well as what skills and services the young and old alike have to offer.

In doing so, they’re making Wayne just the latest Maine town to launch an aging-in-place initiative. A couple dozen Maine communities have been working with AARP – formerly the American Association of Retired Persons – to implement a set of age-friendly practices.”

Read more about aging in place actions in Maine

Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

2017 “Best Cities for Successful Aging”

2017 Best Cities for Successful AgingThe Milken Institute Releases 2017 “Best Cities for Successful Aging” Rankings

Provo-Orem, UT and Iowa City, IA Take Top Spots Among Large and Small Metros

March 14, 2017

“The Milken Institute today released the third edition of its “Best Cities for Successful Aging” report and index, a collaboration between the Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging and its Research Department. The report evaluates 381 U.S. metropolitan areas to determine how well they serve the needs of the nation’s growing population of mature adults, enabling them to age productively, securely, and in optimal health.”

The top 10 large and small metropolitan areas for 2017 are:

Rankings – Large Metros   

Rankings – Small Metros

1

Provo-Orem, UT

1

Iowa City, IA

2

Madison, WI

2

Manhattan, KS

3

Durham-Chapel Hill, NC

3

Ames, IA

4

Salt Lake City, UT

4

Columbia, MO

5

Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA

5

Sioux Falls, SD

6

Austin-Round Rock, TX

6

Ann Arbor, MI

7

Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA

7

Ithaca, NY

8

Jackson, MS

8

Lawrence, KS

9

Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH

9

Logan, UT-ID

10

San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA

10

Fairbanks, AK

Read more

Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

Blueberry supplements provide benefits

blueberry supplements
naturalnews.com

Concentrated blueberry supplement increases cognitive function in older adults, study finds

March 7, 2017

“Drinking concentrated blueberry juice improves brain function in older people, according to research by the University of Exeter.

In the study, healthy people aged 65-77 who drank concentrated blueberry juice every day showed improvements in cognitive function, blood flow to the brain and activation of the brain while carrying out cognitive tests.

There was also evidence suggesting improvement in working memory.”

Read more

Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

A “school for grannies fulfilling life-long dreams”

Widows, Some Aged 90, Start School Near Mumbai, Families Drop Them Off

Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

Hip-Hope for elderly at risk of falling

Hip-Hope
Hip-Hope Technologies

Hip-Hope cushions falls to prevent fractures in elderly

March 6, 2017

The belt-like wearable device is a high-tech Israeli response to a serious and costly health problem faced by the world’s older population.

“When his elderly mother fell and broke a hip for the second time, former Israeli Air Force pilot and industrial and management engineer Amatsia Raanan searched for a product to prevent this most common serious injury in older people.

‘Through her suffering I learned about the epidemic of hip fractures,’ Raanan tells ISRAEL21c.

Each year, nearly 3 million seniors worldwide are hospitalized due to hip fractures. Many of them experience a drastic deterioration in quality of life. And the direct annual cost of treating hip fractures exceeds $15 billion in the US healthcare system alone.

Rather than focus on better ways to treat the broken bone, Raanan decided to leverage cutting-edge technology to protect the pelvis upon impact and avoid injury in the first place. He and three cofounders developed Hip-Hope, a smart wearable device designed as a belt.”

Read more and view videos of its use

Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

Medication management

medication management
healthline.com

Preventing medication mismanagement

Canadian Pharmacists Association

March 5, 2017

“Medication management is an important issue for seniors and their families. Failure to properly manage medications can threaten the lives of seniors, highlighting the emphasis families must place on ensuring seniors take their medications in strict adherence to their instructions.

Polypharmacy, or the taking of multiple medications for different conditions, can be a potential health hazard for the thousands of seniors who must manage health conditions with prescription drugs. Harmful drug interactions are a result of the confusion that can arise when seniors take multiple medications at the same time. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists estimates that more than 34 percent of senior citizens are prescribed medications by more than one physician and 72 percent use medications they were prescribed more than six months prior. Many people also have begun ‘pharmacy shopping’ to save money. According to a study published in 2010 in American Nurse Today, 44 percent of men and 57 percent of women older than age 65 take five or more medications per week, with some taking as many as 10.

Medication confusion is one risk, but older adults also metabolize medications differently than young people. As a result, they may be more susceptible to overdose or other ill effects. Families looking to help seniors effectively manage their medications should consider the following tips.

• Keep a running list of medications. Maintain a list of all medications being taken, noting both prescription and over-the-counter medications and any supplements and herbs. Provide a copy to any new doctors you visit and any new pharmacies you patronize.”

More tips

Aging in place actions in Maine | Living Life Retired (LLR)

Social Security Advice

Social Security Advice
aarp.com

Always Verify Advice on Social Security

by Laurence Kotlikoff, Seattle Times 

March 4, 2017

“Investing

Q: I am now retiring and dealing with Social Security at age 66 after being married 18 years, divorced six years, and still single.

When I attempted to file and suspend, and then file for a restricted benefit based on my ex’s income (so I can delay until age 70 filing for my own maximum benefits), the local Social Security office told me I cannot file on my ex unless she has already filed for benefits. She is now 65 and does not want to file, but my understanding is it does not matter if she files or not. Am I correct? If so, how do I convince the local office?

A: My estimate is that half of Social Security’s answers to questions are either fully or partially wrong. And if they aren’t wrong, they are misleading.”

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